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Your Guide to Malta and Gozo - Media

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Media

The mouthpiece of the Nationalist Party is its daily newspaper, In-Nazzjon together with its Sunday counterpart, Il-Mument. Whilst claiming to be independent publications, It-Torċa, a Sunday newspaper published by the General Workers Union, and its daily equivalentL-Orizzont, expound overt Labour Party leanings. KullĦadd is the official Labour Party newspaper on Sundays. With the intention to touch hearts (and capture votes), these tabloid publications are in the vernacular. On the other hand, Maltastar.com is an on-line Labour newspaper in English.

Until recently, the once a week newspaper Il-Ġens promoted a Roman Catholic agenda. Poor sales and rising costs have however led to this publication’s demise and it is now in its afterlife as the online Il-Gensillum.com.

The two major English language newspapers are The Malta Independent and The Times of Malta; in terms of circulation, The Times wins hands down, with more than 37,000 copies sold daily. The chunkier Sunday version often comes with free goodies : bonus, glossy magazines containing feature articles of general interest. Such publications include: The Sunday Circle and Tune-in; Malta Today is published on Wednesdays and Sundays.

The airwaves were liberalized in 1990; prior to this, local broadcasting was restricted to two state-owned radio stations – Radio Malta One and Radio Malta Two; and one television station: Xandir Malta, also state-owned. Thereafter, a multitude of radio stations saw the light of day. Perhaps not surprisingly, the major political parties have their own stations: Radio 101, belonging to the Nationalist Party; and One Radio (previously known as Super One) belonging to the Labour Party. RTK (Radju ta’ Kulħadd) is owned by the Catholic Church. Similarly, Radju Marija mainly broadcasts programming of a Roman Catholic nature. A good handful of stations are little more than glorified juke boxes, transmitting non-stop music. Radio Malta 1 and Radio Malta 2 have since coalesced into a single station. Meanwhile, some two dozen, short range community stations operate in the various towns and villages.

Xandir Malta has since undergone a name change to TVM, and the political parties have established their own television channels – NET TV, belonging to the Nationalist Party, and One Television, belonging to Labour.

Traditionally, Italian transmissions (RAI and Mediaset channels) have had a devout fan base; with the advent of satellite and cable television however, international television stations have become increasingly popular with Maltese viewers.