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Your Guide to Malta and Gozo - War Memorial

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The War Memorial

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As the Second World War approached its end, the collective psyche of the Cospicuans was fuelled by the majestic return of the titular statue and the choir painting from Birkirkara on 19th November 1944. What a momentous occasion this must have been for the residents of the war-ravaged town as the sacred effigies were carried – on foot – to their rightful place, symbolising Bormla's re-emergence from the ashes.

Five decades later, on 20th November 1994, a spectacular monument by Michael Camilleri Cauchi, a sculptor from Gozo was inaugurated by President Ugo Mifsud Bonnici: a figure on the right hand side holds a tablet inscribed on which is the date of this joyous occasion. An allegory of Bormla holds a slab of marble with the inscription: Bormla ssellem lil Uliedha li mietu fil-Gwerra (Bormla salutes its children who died in the war). One of these victims is gruesomely shown half-buried under a pile of rubble. The imposing central figure of a winged being holding a crown and a cross symbolises the triumphant resurgence of the town after the end of the war. Cherubims and a dove are representative of the peace and tranquillity that ensued after the war ended.